event

American Aquarium, Travis Meadows
Tue June 19, 2018 8:00 pm (Doors: 7:00 pm )
The Southgate House Revival - Sanctuary
Ages 18 and Up
American Aquarium

In the lush tobacco fields of North Carolina where BJ Barham was raised, people work hard.
Families stay nearby, toiling and growing together. BJ loves those farms and his tiny Reidsville
hometown, but he had to run off and start American Aquarium, a band now beloved by
thousands.
BJ couldn’t stay. But he couldn’t really leave, either: he’s still singing about the lessons,
stories, and lives that define rural America––and him.
“I moved to the big city to go to college and fell in love with music,” BJ says. “But half the
songs on our record are about small towns––little pieces of my childhood. I’ve had moments
where it turns out a piece of broken English my father repeated twice a week is the most
accurate way to say something. So I put it in a song.”
American Aquarium’s seventh studio album Things Change offers the band’s finest collection
of folk-infused Southern rock-and- roll to date. Stacked with BJ’s signature storytelling––always
deeply personal but also instantly relatable––the record questions and curses current events,
shares one man’s intimate evolution, and leaves listeners with a priceless gift: hope.
“In my early 20s, I was not as hopeful,” BJ says. “Now, as I’m getting ready to become a
father, I think I have to be hopeful––especially with the situation our country is in now. For her
sake, I have to be positive.” He pauses. “Her” is his daughter, due in the spring of 2018. BJ
adds, “Being self-aware has always been a blessing and a curse. But that’s what’s always
made my songwriting relatable to people. I don’t hold back. I’m almost too honest.”
BJ’s candor has fueled American Aquarium’s runaway appeal, visible most clearly in
consistently sold-out shows across the country and throughout Europe - between 200 and 250
dates a year. Much has changed for the band and BJ since their acclaimed last effort, Wolves.
In 2017, every American Aquarium member save BJ quit the group. American Aquarium has
featured about 30 players since BJ founded the outfit in 2006, and while each member has left
indelible marks, the band has always been anchored by the literary songs and sometimes
roaring, sometimes whispering, drawl of BJ Barham. BJ’s personal life also underwent seismic
shifts: He got sober. He got married. Soon, he’ll be a dad.
Featuring a new band lineup that includes Shane Boeker on lead guitar, drummer Joey Bybee,
bassist Ben Hussey, and Adam Kurtz on pedal steel and electric guitar, as well as a
reinvigorated frontman in BJ, Things Change is American Aquarium’s first release on a label
after selling thousands of records on their own. “As an artist, your goal is for the newest thing
you do to be better than the last. You’re slowly whittling away the bullshit to try and get to the
truth,” BJ says. “With this album, I learned how to cut some of that fat so that it’s just truth. It’s
our best record.”

Recorded at 3CG Records in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Things Change was produced by Grammy-
nominated singer-songwriter John Fulbright and features cameos from Americana standouts
including John Moreland and Jamie Lin Wilson. Brazen album opener “The World is on Fire” is
a richly layered rock-and- roll anthem that documents BJ and his wife’s stunned reaction to the
last presidential election. Emotional and conversational, the song taps into widespread feelings
of confusion and fear: “She said, ‘What are we going to do? What’s this world coming to?’ / For
the first time in my whole life, I stood there speechless.” But what begins as despair builds into
defiant faith, as BJ growls a call to action to cap off one of his favorite songs he’s ever written.
“I’m complaining about the state of things, and then the third verse almost serves as a
challenge to myself: hey, you’re in charge of another human being. You can create change,”
he says.
Driving rock-and- roller “Crooked + Straight” explores the small-town consequences of
questioning religion, and the tightness of family in the face of one member’s rejection. His
father’s advice anchors the song. “I come from a blue-collar family. I’m the only one who didn’t
go into farming. I learned if you want something, you have to go out and take it. You can’t
expect anything from anybody,” BJ says. “You can only go out there and work harder. My dad
always said you can outwork anybody else.” Love for hard work and the people who carry it
out appears repeatedly throughout Things Change. Guitar-heavy “Tough Folks” is a snarling
ode to those with dirt under their fingernails, while bass- and pedal-steel- infused “Work
Conquers All” spins a tale in praise and pursuit of Oklahoma’s state motto.
The album’s love songs are the kind of achingly beautiful that only comes with maturity and a
willingness to expose one’s own flaws. Haunting “Shadows of You” recalls a lover’s flight as
the protagonist longs for what he let get away. Gorgeous “Till the Final Curtain Falls”
celebrates loyalty and pledges endless devotion. The moving title track takes an often doleful
topic––people’s tendency to change––and turns it on its head, tracing BJ’s personal growth
and recognizing his now-wife’s steadfast love.
BJ’s other two favorite tracks are album standouts. Moving “When We Were Younger Men”
addresses the break-up of American Aquarium head on. As BJ professes love for his former
bandmates over stripped down acoustic guitar, his voice is honeyed and deep. “It’s an open
letter to five guys who I spent eight years of my life with seeing the entire world,” BJ says. “I
think anyone who has ever had to walk away from a friendship or has had somebody walk
away from them will relate to the song.” Stunner “One Day at a Time” is self-perceptive and
vulnerable, detailing BJ’s battles with himself. Even within his career full of well-written gems,
the song is a towering accomplishment.
“At the end of the day, if you’re not writing songs to affect other people’s lives, you’re in it for
the wrong reasons,” BJ says, reflecting on the new album, where he’s been, and where
American Aquarium is headed. “Money may come and go. You may never get fame. But if you
sit down and write songs to affect people, you can do it your whole life and be happy.”

Travis Meadows

Travis Meadows spent years trying to escape himself. He’s anything but selfish, so he’d find a way to get away––a bottle, a bag, a sermon––and he’d share it with everyone. That was then. Now, Meadows isn’t trying to get anybody lost or high. Instead, he’s trying to get every single one of us to settle in deeply to ourselves––and love what’s there.

“I feel like what I’m doing is giving people permission to be okay with who they are, where they’re at now,” Meadows says. “A lot of us say stuff like, ‘If I’d been married to this guy or this girl, or if I had enough money, or if I had a better job. If I wasn’t an alcoholic, or if I drank more. If this, if that, then, I think I could be a better person.’” He pauses. “I think the key to life is being okay with who you are.”

Meadows isn’t just waxing poetic about the perks of self-acceptance. The 52-year-old has clawed his way to the peace he’s found, and his willingness to map that journey through his songs has saved more lives than his own. On his anxiously awaited new album First Cigarette, Meadows proves once again that when he sings the truth he’s living, he can set us all free. “I’ve always put secrets in my records, but I had this ring of fire that nobody could get in––a defense mechanism from my childhood. Nobody gets too close,” he says. “I think this record is a way of me letting people in a little more, inside the ring of fire.”

Disciples have been dancing by Meadows’ fire for years. Eric Church, Dierks Bentley, Jake Owen, Mary Gauthier, Brandy Clark, Blackberry Smoke, Hank Williams, Jr., Wynonna Judd, Randy Houser, and others began writing with, recording, and praising Meadows as soon as they heard his work. Songs such as “Riser,” the title track for Bentley’s 2015 album; Church’s “Knives of New Orleans” and “Dark Side”; and Owen’s “What We Ain’t Got” are all Meadows-penned chart-climbers.

Much of the attention began in 2010, when Meadows self-released Killin’ Uncle Buzzy, a raw masterpiece that left listeners stunned. “I was in rehab, and one of my counselors suggested that I keep a journal, so I basically made a record out of that journal,” Meadows says. It became an unlikely phenomenon, handed from friend to friend and artist to artist with whispers of, Listen. It’s the best thing you’ll hear all year. In 2013, Meadows followed Killin’ Uncle Buzzy with the acclaimed Old Ghosts and Unfinished Business. “On Killin’ Uncle Buzzy, you’re listening to a guy trying to figure out how to get sober,” Meadows says. “Then two years later, I was sober, but I wasn’t that guy anymore. That’s what ‘Old Ghosts’ was––me just trying to move forward. I feel like this record is more accessible. People can listen and go, ‘Well, hell. I’ve done that, too.’”

An intimate record utilizing just Meadow’s blues-hewn voice and mostly acoustic guitar with pops of electric and other strings, First Cigarette is an intensely relatable meditation on love, acceptance, and redemption––an artistic and personal triumph, especially for a man whose early life was defined by loss and pain. At the age of two, Meadows watched his baby brother drown. When his parents divorced, he wound up living with his grandparents rather than either of his parents. “My dad went and got married and had a baby, and they were almost a normal family,” Meadows says. “And my mother also went and almost had a normal family, whatever that is.” His thick Mississippi accent makes the ‘r’ at the end of father and mother soft in his mouth. “I was over there with my grandparents like, ‘Well what the hell happened to me? Why am I not good enough to be part of that family?’ I carried that resentment for a long time.”

Adversity would remain a constant in Meadows’ youth. At the age of eleven, he began using drugs. At fourteen, he was diagnosed with cancer. He would go on to beat the disease, but not before it cost him his right leg from just below the knee. Meadows picked himself up and began playing drums––“They’d sneak me in the back door and I would play for people in bars”––but tired of lugging all that gear and picked up the harmonica. “I could put all my instruments in a Crown Royal bag, and I would sing and play the blues,” he says. Then, in his 20s, Meadows underwent another conversion: he became a Christian. He preached across the South and in 20-something countries for 17 years. “Preachers fall hard,” he says. “I had some questions I didn’t like the answers to. So I quit and went back to my old friend alcohol.”

First Cigarette benefits from all of the battles Meadows has lost and won, including his now seven years––and counting––of sobriety. Album opener “Sideways” is a gut punch. A blend of confession and advice, the song explores what happens when emotion is stifled. Meadows wrote “Sideways” after performing and speaking at an adolescent addiction treatment center. He asked the kids there, all younger than 18, if anyone wanted to share their story. A girl raised her hand, spoke, and broke Meadows’ heart. “She floored me,” he says. “I said, ‘Well, I’d want to get high too. How did that make you feel?’ One tear came down her cheek. She rubbed it away and said, ‘I don’t feel nothin’.’ One of the counselors and I were talking later. If the only tool you have is a hammer, you’re going to treat everything in your life like a nail.”

“Pray for Jungleland” channels Bruce Springsteen as it celebrates him, nostalgic for love at eighteen and a world that revolves around Friday night. Written with Drew Kennedy, the song is the first of several on the album that capture youth with misty-eyed levity––a departure from Uncle Buzzy that Meadows is clearly enjoying. “McDowell Road” serves as a thematic bookend for “Jungleland,” while the slow-building “Pontiac” offers anchoring advice and warm memories as hopes for young hearts.

A standout on an album stacked with gems, “First Cigarette” features searing vocals that shift back and forth between defiant muscle and naked delicacy. “I am little more content, I am little more content with who I am than who I was,” Meadows sings. “I have learned to love the comfort when it comes, like the first cigarette the morning buzz.” Written with Connie Harrington, “Hungry” showcases Meadows’ unique ability to haunt and soothe at the same time. “Hunger is the thing that motivates us to get up and try again,” he says. “I pray that I never lose that hunger.” The gorgeous “Better Boat” takes another moving look at Meadows’ hard-won contentment.

“Life can be a little challenging for all of us. It’s beautiful and it’s tragic, it’s awesome and it hurts,” Meadows says. “I hope people sense that through this record and want to come to a show, which is a lot of storytelling, a lot of tears, a lot of laughter. They’ll come face to face with a damn lot of humanity. I hope they see themselves in it.”